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Thread: The 'extraordinary' DNA of the Scots

  1. #1
    Forum owner Ishtar Babilu Dingir's Avatar
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    Default The 'extraordinary' DNA of the Scots

    The DNA of people living in Scotland has "extraordinary" and "unexpected" diversity, according to a new study.

    The Scotland's DNA project, led by Edinburgh University's Dr Jim Wilson, has tested almost 1,000 Scots in the last four months to determine the genetic roots of people in the country.

    The project discovered four new male lineages, which account for one in 10 Scottish men.
    It also found that actor Tom Conti is related to Napoleon Bonaparte.

    _59698206_005745450-1.jpg


    Scotland's DNA was set up by Dr Wilson along with historian Alistair Moffat, the current rector of St Andrews University.

    Using new technology, scientists were able to pinpoint a participant's DNA marker, from which they tracked the person's history and lineage.

    Conti and Napoleon both share the M34 marker, which is Saracen in origin.

    The project found that Scotland has almost 100 different groups of male ancestry from across Europe and further afield.

    More than 150 different types of female DNA from Europe, Asia and Africa were discovered.

    Royal line

    Researchers believe that Scotland's location could be a factor in the "astonishing and unique" origins of people from the country.

    In a statement, Dr Wilson and Mr Moffat said: "Perhaps geography, Scotland's place at the farthest north-western end of the European peninsula, is the reason for great diversity.

    "For many thousands of years, migrants could move no further west. Scotland was the end of many journeys."

    Scotland's DNA also found that more than 1% of all Scotsmen are direct descendants of the Berber and Tuareg tribesmen of the Sahara, a lineage which is around 5600 years old.

    Royal Stewart DNA was confirmed in 15% of male participants with the Stewart surname. They are directly descended from the royal line of kings.

    Scientists believe comedian and presenter Fred MacAuley's ancestors were slaves, sold at the great slave market in Dublin in the 9th Century, despite his name suggesting a Viking heritage.

    They said MacAuley's slave ancestor was taken by ship to the Hebrides and had an affair with his owner's wife, thereby intruding DNA into the MacAulay line.

    Scotland's DNA will soon be renamed Britain's DNA as the project aims to widen its genetic study to include the English, Welsh and Irish.


    From BBC news
    ISHTAR BABILU DINGIR: Author of Lord of the Dance, a book about life in the Indian ashram of the late Sathya Sai Baba, and The Sacred Sex Rites of Ishtar: Shamanic sexual healing and sex magic Both books available on Amazon.

  2. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Ishtar Babilu Dingir For This Useful Post:

    Cognito (April 19th, 2012),firestorm (April 19th, 2012),Mike Williams (April 19th, 2012),wizard_paradox (April 19th, 2012)

  3. #2
    Forum Resident wizard_paradox's Avatar
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    Wha's Like Us

    Damn Few And They're A' Died!

    The average Englishman in the home he calls his castle
    slips into his national costume, a shabby raincoat, patented
    by Chemist Charles MacIntosh from Glasgow, Scotland.

    En-route to his office he strides along the English lane,
    surfaced by John Macadam of Ayr, Scotland.

    He drives an English car fitted with tyres invented by
    John Boyd Dunlop, Veterinary Surgeon of
    Dreghorn, Scotland.

    At the office he receives the mail bearing adhesive
    stamps invented by John Chalmers, Bookseller and
    Printer of Dundee, Scotland.

    During the day he uses the telephone invented by
    Alexander Graham Bell, born in Edinburgh, Scotland.
    At home in the evening his daughter pedals her bicycle
    invented by Kirkpatrick Macmillan, Blacksmith of
    Thornhill, Dumfriesshire, Scotland.

    He watches the news on television, an invention of John
    Logie Baird
    of Helensburgh, Scotland, and hears an
    item about the U.S. Navy founded by John
    Paul Jones of Kirkbean, Scotland.

    Nowhere can an Englishman turn to escape the ingenuity of the Scots.

    He has by now been reminded too much of Scotland and
    in desperation he picks up the Bible, only to find that
    the first man mentioned in the good book is a Scot,
    King James VI, who authorised its translation.

    He could take to drink but the Scots make the best in the world.

    He could take a rifle and end it all, but the breech-loading
    rifle was invented by Captain Patrick Ferguson of
    Pitfours, Scotland.

    If he escaped death, he could find himself on an operating
    table injected with penicillin, discovered by Sir Alexander
    Fleming
    of Darvel, Scotland, and given chloroform, an
    anesthetic discovered by Sir James Young Simpson,
    Obstetrician and Gynecologist of Bathgate, Scotland.

    Out of the anesthetic he would find no comfort in learning
    that he was as safe as the Bank of England founded by
    William Paterson of Dumfries, Scotland.

    Perhaps his only remaining hope would be to get a transfusion
    of guid Scottish blood which would entitle him tae ask
    "Wha's like us? damm few an' there a' deed"
    Damn Few And They're A' Died!

    The average Englishman in the home he calls his castle
    slips into his national costume, a shabby raincoat, patented
    by Chemist Charles MacIntosh from Glasgow, Scotland.

    En-route to his office he strides along the English lane,
    surfaced by John Macadam of Ayr, Scotland.

    He drives an English car fitted with tyres invented by
    John Boyd Dunlop, Veterinary Surgeon of
    Dreghorn, Scotland.

    At the office he receives the mail bearing adhesive
    stamps invented by John Chalmers, Bookseller and
    Printer of Dundee, Scotland.

    During the day he uses the telephone invented by
    Alexander Graham Bell, born in Edinburgh, Scotland.
    At home in the evening his daughter pedals her bicycle
    invented by Kirkpatrick Macmillan, Blacksmith of
    Thornhill, Dumfriesshire, Scotland.

    He watches the news on television, an invention of John
    Logie Baird
    of Helensburgh, Scotland, and hears an
    item about the U.S. Navy founded by John
    Paul Jones of Kirkbean, Scotland.

    Nowhere can an Englishman turn to escape the ingenuity of the Scots.

    He has by now been reminded too much of Scotland and
    in desperation he picks up the Bible, only to find that
    the first man mentioned in the good book is a Scot,
    King James VI, who authorised its translation.

    He could take to drink but the Scots make the best in the world.

    He could take a rifle and end it all, but the breech-loading
    rifle was invented by Captain Patrick Ferguson of
    Pitfours, Scotland.

    If he escaped death, he could find himself on an operating
    table injected with penicillin, discovered by Sir Alexander
    Fleming
    of Darvel, Scotland, and given chloroform, an
    anesthetic discovered by Sir James Young Simpson,
    Obstetrician and Gynecologist of Bathgate, Scotland.

    Out of the anesthetic he would find no comfort in learning
    that he was as safe as the Bank of England founded by
    William Paterson of Dumfries, Scotland.

    Perhaps his only remaining hope would be to get a transfusion
    of guid Scottish blood which would entitle him tae ask
    "Wha's like us? damm few an' there a' deed"
    Quote Originally Posted by Ishtar View Post
    The DNA of people living in Scotland has "extraordinary" and "unexpected" diversity, according to a new study.

    The Scotland's DNA project, led by Edinburgh University's Dr Jim Wilson, has tested almost 1,000 Scots in the last four months to determine the genetic roots of people in the country.

    The project discovered four new male lineages, which account for one in 10 Scottish men.
    It also found that actor Tom Conti is related to Napoleon Bonaparte.

    _59698206_005745450-1.jpg


    Scotland's DNA was set up by Dr Wilson along with historian Alistair Moffat, the current rector of St Andrews University.

    Using new technology, scientists were able to pinpoint a participant's DNA marker, from which they tracked the person's history and lineage.

    Conti and Napoleon both share the M34 marker, which is Saracen in origin.

    The project found that Scotland has almost 100 different groups of male ancestry from across Europe and further afield.

    More than 150 different types of female DNA from Europe, Asia and Africa were discovered.

    Royal line

    Researchers believe that Scotland's location could be a factor in the "astonishing and unique" origins of people from the country.

    In a statement, Dr Wilson and Mr Moffat said: "Perhaps geography, Scotland's place at the farthest north-western end of the European peninsula, is the reason for great diversity.

    "For many thousands of years, migrants could move no further west. Scotland was the end of many journeys."

    Scotland's DNA also found that more than 1% of all Scotsmen are direct descendants of the Berber and Tuareg tribesmen of the Sahara, a lineage which is around 5600 years old.

    Royal Stewart DNA was confirmed in 15% of male participants with the Stewart surname. They are directly descended from the royal line of kings.

    Scientists believe comedian and presenter Fred MacAuley's ancestors were slaves, sold at the great slave market in Dublin in the 9th Century, despite his name suggesting a Viking heritage.

    They said MacAuley's slave ancestor was taken by ship to the Hebrides and had an affair with his owner's wife, thereby intruding DNA into the MacAulay line.

    Scotland's DNA will soon be renamed Britain's DNA as the project aims to widen its genetic study to include the English, Welsh and Irish.


    From BBC news

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    Forum Resident wizard_paradox's Avatar
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    What ticked my were 2 ladies from Morningside sooo snobbish and proud. Under investigation of their DNA it appeared that in the distant past - their origins were from the region now called Pakistan

  6. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to wizard_paradox For This Useful Post:

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    Problem with england is inbreeding and XXY. It might be possible to get Y gene male from X female gene of male. lol

  8. #5
    Forum owner Ishtar Babilu Dingir's Avatar
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    Yes, lots of interbreeding. We're all mongrols here... well, most of us!
    ISHTAR BABILU DINGIR: Author of Lord of the Dance, a book about life in the Indian ashram of the late Sathya Sai Baba, and The Sacred Sex Rites of Ishtar: Shamanic sexual healing and sex magic Both books available on Amazon.

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